How to live simply, Hawaiian style

With all that’s going on in the world today, “living simply” can easily feel out of reach — even in a laid-back place like Hawaii.

But there are ways to do it. It just takes a certain mindset and follow through. Here are some tips to get you started on “living simply”:

Meditate

person meditating on a Hawaii beach

Meditation has a way of showing us what is essential and what isn’t, and believe it or not — most all of our thoughts are non-essential.

Therefore, don’t think it’s cliche to sit with legs crossed, eyes closed, and intention entirely focused on breathing.

Meditation is always free and you can do it pretty much anywhere, anytime.

Be pono

Pono is the Hawaiian word for balance, but it also means “doing the right thing,” or integrity. In practice, this can mean balancing your work with your quality of life, or having moderation in all that you do (including moderation!).

Go outside every day

If you’re in Hawaii, you get zero excuses to stay indoors for more than a few hours at a time.

Even if your mind is “commanding” you to stay put at your laptop or TV, listen to what your body craves: movement, sunshine, and fresh air. And if it’s raining — go outside anyway, it’s probably just a cool, passing shower.

Do as the locals do

In general, life in Hawaii is good and simple — we basically work, play, eat, and spend time with friends and family. This steady rhythm takes the hard edge off of life, giving it a sense of joy and spaciousness.

In fact, you could say that people of Hawaii work to live, not live to work. There’s really no secret to it.

And you don’t need to work 60 hours a week to make a difference.

Keep it lo-tech

Technology is awesome, I admit, but it’s also…addicting.

No matter how much we progress, no technology can ever replace life’s remarkable lo-tech pleasures, like a sunrise walk on the beach with the taste of sea salt in the air, or the sounds of swaying palm trees and crashing surf from your hammock.

Nature’s potential is limitless.

As much as you think you need whatever is on your screen, remember that you have a choice to turn it off, put it down, and walk away.

Image credits: Chelsea Gates, Dai López, Brian Chen, Julian Armstrong, Tell Death I’m Busy, Jean-Baptiste Lefevre, little plant, Eleonora Patricola

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